Pound Foolish

Before I go any further, I would like to take a moment for cats. Last weekend I returned to the cat café and, as requested, took pictures so as to post them here. I took many but here are two, including one that showcases my new favorite hashtag (that I invented), #catsofclue.

This week was also my birthday (happy birthday to me, yes, thank you). I was at work for ten hours but it was fine, whatever. There was cake which we had to quickly scarf down in the ten minute break between classes, but all the other teachers were very kind. And the cake was pretty good (it was from Paris Baguette).

I had grand notions of writing this week’s thoughtful section on capitalism, greed, shortsightedness, and general social woes. Inspired by dumb things at work and this truly wonderful Vox piece on the subject. However, I did not work preemptively and I am unwilling to put too much effort into it now as it’s aftern 10 pm and I’ve been at work since noon. Shame on me for being more proactive, bad blogger (though you’re probably relieved I won’t be waxing eloquent about socialism). Anyway, here’s the boiled-down version.

People are greedy. Extremely rich people are very insulated from normal people. If things don’t change, there probably will be a revolution. By change, I mean capitalism itself, even if I don’t mean an actual, total shift to socialism.

The big lie is this: everything can keep growing forever.

It’s what contemporary capitalism is based on and it’s self-evidently ridiculous. Somehow we’re going to have to get rid of that idea, protect people’s welfare, and save the environment. Solutions must be very creative. It’s hard to even comprehend what it will actually look like. I really encourage you to read that article, I found that it artfully articulated many things that I have either thought about or vaguely felt for many years. Besides, if-not-you-who/if-not-now-when and all that.

In this, as in so many areas, people are shortsighted. Penny wise, as they say, and pound foolish. That is not really the original meaning of the phrase but I find it appropriate. We like to consider ourselves prudent and level-headed about the most minor issues in our lives but the big, systemic, catastrophic problems leave us unperturbed. Richard Branson (whose autobiography I’m currently reading for class) said of climate change, if I may paraphrase, that we’ve all agreed the building we’re in is on fire but calmly sit around and do nothing (there’s an applicable meme). It’s true of me, my boss, society, and the world at large.

Let’s take a second to look at the big picture. Do you like what you see?

This is not quite the post I wanted, a polemic against the evil forces of capitalism, wealthy people, and bosses who’ve never done the work of their subordinates. But whatever, it is what it is.

In this era of late capitalism, for I agree with Mr. Weinstein’s assessment, I feel like railing against the establishment is both mainstream and ridiculous. And I am strongly skeptical of anyone’s ‘enlightened self-interest,’ especially the ultra-rich. But anyway.

I’m not saying always plan for the future. But consider it, even apart from any particular plans. But consider what the future may look like. And spend your pounds like your pennies. Pence. Whatever.

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